800-649-MOLD
Home Seller Protection

Home Seller Protection

Mold can be a scary thought when selling your home. But there is little reason to be concerned if you have properly maintained your home, taken prudent measures to repair and document moisture and mold-related problems. Still, mold can be a problem. Here are some of the more common pitfalls:

Disclose, Disclose, Disclose – Disclose everything and don’t conceal anything. Whether intentional or not, failure to disclose information is the biggest headache that a seller encounters. Maintain a comprehensive list of all repairs (major and minor), especially water damage. Before you list your property, inspect and repair all areas, such as wall cavities.

Make All Necessary Repairs – Before you list the property, be sure to take prudent steps to repair all damage related to water intrusion and mold contamination. Now is not the time to cover up mold growth with bucket after bucket of paint. If you suspect a mold problem, hire a professional to investigate. Remember, a modest expense now can save thousands on the sale of your home, or in litigation costs in the future.

Document – One of the advantages of paying the added expense of a professional mold investigation and abatement is that you now have sound documentation for future disclosure. You can demonstrate with confidence that you have taken the steps necessary to identify and repair all known concerns. But be sure your consultant and abatement contractor provides a detailed account of all work performed (and all important dates).

Educate and Cooperate – Buyers are becoming much more knowledgeable on mold contamination and the risks it poses to their new home. As a seller you too should become aware of your rights and liabilities. At the same time, respect the buyer's concern without giving in to their every whim. If there is a justifiable reason to suspect microbial contamination, work with the sellers to resolve this issue.

Be Willing to Assume Partial Costs - If a legitimate, unabated concern exists, either agree to repair the problem before the sale or be willing to assume partial cost for future repairs. But be sure to agree to limits—signing a blank check is an invitation to financial disaster, especially in litigation matters involving personal injury. The same holds true for areas that you know have been repaired, but clearance testing demonstrates residual levels of contamination. Get an attorney to review all agreements prior to signing on the dotted line.

Perform a Mold Inspection Prior to Listing - The proactive seller will already have the results of a mold inspection in hand prior to listing. We only recommend this if the property has sustained prior water damage or mold contamination. Your proactive stance will be viewed as a good-faith gesture. But be sure to follow through by giving the sellers the opportunity to contact the consultant directly

For more information on how Mold Doctor can help, contact us at 1-800-649-MOLD.

« Back to Main Protection Plans page

Home Seller Protection

Mold can be a scary thought when selling your home. But there is little reason to be concerned if you have properly maintained your home, taken prudent measures to repair and document moisture and mold-related problems. Still, mold can be a problem. Here are some of the more common pitfalls:

Disclose, Disclose, Disclose – Disclose everything and don’t conceal anything. Whether intentional or not, failure to disclose information is the biggest headache that a seller encounters. Maintain a comprehensive list of all repairs (major and minor), especially water damage. Before you list your property, inspect and repair all areas, such as wall cavities.

Make All Necessary Repairs – Before you list the property, be sure to take prudent steps to repair all damage related to water intrusion and mold contamination. Now is not the time to cover up mold growth with bucket after bucket of paint. If you suspect a mold problem, hire a professional to investigate. Remember, a modest expense now can save thousands on the sale of your home, or in litigation costs in the future.

Document – One of the advantages of paying the added expense of a professional mold investigation and abatement is that you now have sound documentation for future disclosure. You can demonstrate with confidence that you have taken the steps necessary to identify and repair all known concerns. But be sure your consultant and abatement contractor provides a detailed account of all work performed (and all important dates).

Educate and Cooperate – Buyers are becoming much more knowledgeable on mold contamination and the risks it poses to their new home. As a seller you too should become aware of your rights and liabilities. At the same time, respect the buyer's concern without giving in to their every whim. If there is a justifiable reason to suspect microbial contamination, work with the sellers to resolve this issue.

Be Willing to Assume Partial Costs - If a legitimate, unabated concern exists, either agree to repair the problem before the sale or be willing to assume partial cost for future repairs. But be sure to agree to limits—signing a blank check is an invitation to financial disaster, especially in litigation matters involving personal injury. The same holds true for areas that you know have been repaired, but clearance testing demonstrates residual levels of contamination. Get an attorney to review all agreements prior to signing on the dotted line.

Perform a Mold Inspection Prior to Listing - The proactive seller will already have the results of a mold inspection in hand prior to listing. We only recommend this if the property has sustained prior water damage or mold contamination. Your proactive stance will be viewed as a good-faith gesture. But be sure to follow through by giving the sellers the opportunity to contact the consultant directly

For more information on how Mold Doctor can help, contact us at 1-800-649-MOLD.

« Back to Main Protection Plans page