800-649-MOLD
Home Buyer Protection

Home Buyer Protection

As a buyer, being proactive is especially important in the inspection process. Keep these tips in mind as you look through the property.

Disclosure – Demand full disclosure of concerns such as prior water damage, structural repairs, and the assessment or abatement of any mold related problem. Not all states have mold disclosure laws in effect yet.

Inspection – Conduct a general home inspection prior to closing to avoid potentially catastrophic losses. Although general home inspectors are not experts in microbial contamination, they will likely identify the most obvious signs of prior water damage, common cover-up tactics, and even suspected mold growth.

Follow Up – Consult the real estate agent or owner if you have any concern or suspicions. If you feel apprehensive about the answers, walk away or pursue further investigation. Also, verify the responses with documentation of repairs; search the building permit office’s records for past repairs; or consult with all prior owners as identified by city records.

Hire an Expert – If you are still uncertain and you don’t want to lose your dream home, demand a thorough inspection by a microbial contamination specialist or a microbial expert. Some sellers will balk at this while others will allow any steps necessary to complete the deal (cost will probably be assumed by the prospective buyer).

Work with the Seller - If the seller discloses the existence of a prior mold problem, ask to review all relevant information such as investigative reports and abatement plans. The seller should be able to demonstrate that the problem was properly abated. If you are in doubt, consult with a specialist. Ask permission to speak with the consultant involved in the original investigation - many sellers will cooperate and help you assess the current risks. If you have arrived at this stage, it’s usually a sign that the seller has done everything in their power to be cooperative, honest, and pragmatic—so work with them. In many cases, they may also be willing to assume part of the financial burden should future contamination emerge from suspected building materials.

“As is”- Purchasing a home on an "as is" basis is extremely risky, especially in today's world of mold lawsuits. Remember, once your name is associated with the home, you will become wholly or partially responsible for all subsequent repairs –even well after you have resold the home.

For more information on how Mold Doctor can help determine if your future home has mold problems, contact us at 1-800-649-MOLD.

« Back to Main Protection Plans page

Home Buyer Protection

As a buyer, being proactive is especially important in the inspection process. Keep these tips in mind as you look through the property.

Disclosure – Demand full disclosure of concerns such as prior water damage, structural repairs, and the assessment or abatement of any mold related problem. Not all states have mold disclosure laws in effect yet.

Inspection – Conduct a general home inspection prior to closing to avoid potentially catastrophic losses. Although general home inspectors are not experts in microbial contamination, they will likely identify the most obvious signs of prior water damage, common cover-up tactics, and even suspected mold growth.

Follow Up – Consult the real estate agent or owner if you have any concern or suspicions. If you feel apprehensive about the answers, walk away or pursue further investigation. Also, verify the responses with documentation of repairs; search the building permit office’s records for past repairs; or consult with all prior owners as identified by city records.

Hire an Expert – If you are still uncertain and you don’t want to lose your dream home, demand a thorough inspection by a microbial contamination specialist or a microbial expert. Some sellers will balk at this while others will allow any steps necessary to complete the deal (cost will probably be assumed by the prospective buyer).

Work with the Seller - If the seller discloses the existence of a prior mold problem, ask to review all relevant information such as investigative reports and abatement plans. The seller should be able to demonstrate that the problem was properly abated. If you are in doubt, consult with a specialist. Ask permission to speak with the consultant involved in the original investigation - many sellers will cooperate and help you assess the current risks. If you have arrived at this stage, it’s usually a sign that the seller has done everything in their power to be cooperative, honest, and pragmatic—so work with them. In many cases, they may also be willing to assume part of the financial burden should future contamination emerge from suspected building materials.

“As is”- Purchasing a home on an "as is" basis is extremely risky, especially in today's world of mold lawsuits. Remember, once your name is associated with the home, you will become wholly or partially responsible for all subsequent repairs –even well after you have resold the home.

For more information on how Mold Doctor can help determine if your future home has mold problems, contact us at 1-800-649-MOLD.

« Back to Main Protection Plans page